Zoë Knight – Come Here My Darling Lover

This was a fun mix. It’s as simple as you can get; 2 mono tracks, piano and vocals, reasonably well recorded with a nice microphone. The piano is a stunning 1893 Steinway Model A with a gorgeous tone, and Zoë is in full command of her voice. There were a few bumps and background noises that needed some repair, but the biggest challenge was to add a sense of spaciousness to the song, given the mono character of the sources. Also, the vocal track is a quite dynamic performance that required a bit of taming to get it to sit well with the piano. I used a lot of techniques, including EQ, a few different compression schemes, reverb, saturation, and delay. The final mix has a lot of ambience in it, perhaps a bit much for some but I thought the song called for it.

I’m happy with how this came out. It’s a real testament to the fact that if you have a decent mic, a great-sounding instrument, and a good mix, anyone can make great recordings. This Syren’s song is an appropriate song for Valentine’s Day, so give it a listen!

Podcast Episode 14: Pagan Anarchism with C.S. Thompson

pagan-anarchism-1The first book published by Gods & Radicals was the very worthy Pagan Anarchism by C.S. Thompson. This episode features an interview with the author, discussing the context of his book.

“What I see as the crisis of the modern world is that we are trained, if not brainwashed, to see the world as being dead. Dead matter. Not infused with spirit. And so, because of this mentality which was shared by both the capitalist world and the authoritarian communist regimes… we have done so much damage to the environment that Earth won’t be able to sustain a complex civilization like ours for much longer if we don’t change course. So my argument is that we need to return to a conception of the world as being absolutely filled with spirit, an animistic conception of the world, which is the core idea of pagan religion.”
–C.S. Thompson,

There are several poems in the book, two of which, “To The Goddess Of The City” and “To The God Of The Wood”, were performed by Joie Grandbois for this episode. Music here is “Thieves Oil” by the fabulous Disemballerina.

Audio recording produced by James Lindenschmidt. ©2016 Crafted Recordings. Some Rights Reserved (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0).

Podcast Episode 13: Fascism, Solidarity, & War Magic

fascism-solidarity-war-magic-3

“We have what we’ve always had, which is each other. We have the ability to come together.”
— Shane Burley

“Pushing back against the atomization of the individual is the bedrock of … solidarity. Once we have that, it’s possible to really push back.”
— Ryan Smith

“A fertile and new American resistance is blossoming, and it needs a magical edge.”
— Dr. Bones

This episode has a lot of fun stuff in it. It begins with an automated recital of the 14 characteristics of fascism. Next, is an invocation by Kiarna Boyd, performed by Cassandra Boyd, “To Thems What Practice War Magic.”  After that is excerpts from a discussion on fascism with Shane Burley and Ryan Smith. Dr Bones also has an an inspiring sermon about the importance of the magical edge of resistance and linking up with people around you.

Music from this episode is “Inside The Forest,” from Eddy Dyer‘s new album, Love Is At The Heart Of This Thing, Right? This album was just released and I’m very excited about it, since I was involved as a producer, recordist, and mixer. It was a pleasure to work with Eddy, and this track had the perfect vibe for this episode. Drums by Charles Greenwood, piano by Zoe Knight. Vocals, synthesizers, and theremins by Eddy Dyer.

Kiarna Boyd is an author, a practicing Geomancer, and a System Administrator. More info: www.blessedandcursedalike.com.

Shane Burley is a journalist and filmmaker based in Portland, Oregon.  His work has been featured in places like ThinkProgress, In These Times, Waging Nonviolence, Labor Notes, Roar Magazine, and Make/Shift.  He has provided interviews and research on fascism and the far right to places like The Guardian and the Huffington Post, and is currently working on a book on neo-fascism for AK Press.  His work can be found at ShaneBurley.net and at Twitter at @shane_burley1.

Ryan Smith is a Heathen devoted to Odin living in the San Francisco Bay Area. He is the co-founder of Heathens United Against Racism, a founding member of Golden Gate Kindred, is active in the environmental justice and anti-police brutality movements, and recently completed his Masters in modern Middle East History and economics.

Dr. Bones, as always, can be found at The Conjure House, on Gods & Radicals, and on Disinfo.

Audio recording produced by James Lindenschmidt. ©2016 Crafted Recordings. Some Rights Reserved (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0).

Eddy Dyer – Heart Of Your Rage

heartofyourrage-coverHeart Of Your Rage is the second single from Eddy’s forthcoming album, Love is At The Heart of This Thing, Right? We’ve been working on this album for several months and I couldn’t be more excited about it. Give a listen here:

Musically, there’s a lot going on here. Acoustic guitar and a single vocal take are the foundation of the song, with several layers of electric guitars (played by both Eddy and by Justin Spicer) coming in & out of focus as the song progresses. One of the more subtle guitar tracks was recorded at Battery Steele on Peaks Island, Maine, which was one of the most fun recording sessions I’ve ever been a part of. Eddy also played bass, and there is also cool synth drone that runs in the background throughout the song. There are drums (played by Chuck Greenwood and recorded by Bob Nash at Wonka Sound in Lowell, MA).  About 2:00 in you can hear a kid’s choir directed by Eddy & Seth Bailin. The song slowly builds all the way up to the climactic ending. After I dialed in the final mix, the song was mastered by Scott over at Old Colony Mastering, who will also be mastering the album when it’s finished.

All that is well and good, but the real story with this song is with the lyrics, which are quite timely in this world:

After our fight, I let the cedar wolf lead me deep inside
into the angry flesh of a tulip, partially capsized.
When we washed the blood from our faces at the heart of it all
we could see the bottomless well behind the cracks in the wall;

It said,
“Illuminate the love that resides within the heart of your rage
Illuminate the love that is hiding in the heart of your rage
because later or soon, there’ll be
none but the moon left to blame
so cast off what’s been burned in the fire,
keep what’s been forged in the flame.

Liberate the love that resides within the heart of your rage
Liberate the love that is hiding in the heart of your rage
because in sin or in grace, there’s but one face
that carries your name
so cast off what’s been burned in the fire,
keep what’s been forged in the flames

Watch the stars, they’re moving

Celebrate the love that resides within the heart of your rage
celebrate the love that is hiding in the heart of your rage
because in sin or in grace, there’s but one face
whose ways you can change
so cast off what’s been burned in the fire,
keep what’s been forged in the flames

and love.

Enjoy the song. If you really enjoy it, then support Eddy as we complete this album.

Podcast Episode 12: The Dead Speak

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October 31st is a good day to tell tales of the dead. For this episode, I recorded Pete Witham & The Cozmik Zombies doing their song “Dancing With The Dead.” Thanks to Jon Wyman and the guys at The Halo for the recording space. Pete Witham wrote the song, sang it, and played lead guitar. Drew Wyman played upright bass. Steve Dunphy played acoustic guitar and sang backing vocals.

Spoken word contributions came from several of my favorite Gods & Radicals writers. In order of appearance, they are:

The background sound on this podcast is a result of an accident with a campfire, a time machine, and a cave. It’s a long story.

Artwork in the image above is “Hornblower” by Danial Ryan. Used with permission.

What is remembered, lives. Hail the Dead!

Audio recording produced by James Lindenschmidt. ©2016 Crafted Recordings. Some Rights Reserved (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0).

Podcast Episode 11: Music & Magic with Oz Fritz

magic-and-music-3

ozfritzquoteIn this episode, I spoke with recording engineer, music producer, and practitioner of Thelemic magic Oz Fritz. Oz has an extensive credit list in recording, having worked with Bill Laswell, Bernie Worrell, Tom Waits, Oysterhead, Primus, Hakim, Bey, and many, many others.

We spoke about creating space in magic & music, consciousness, brain change, quantum physics, and quite a bit about recording and mixing music and audio.

All the music heard in this episode was recorded & mixed by Oz, and performed by Bernie Worrell, used with permission. Songs include:

Audio recording produced by James Lindenschmidt. ©2016 Crafted Recordings. Some Rights Reserved (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0).

Pagan Anarchism

So the good folks over at Gods & Radicals asked me to produce a short soundtrack to this trailer film, advertising the new book — Pagan Anarchism — from C.S. Thompson coming out:

This book looks amazing, I can’t wait to check it out.

Putting the soundtrack together was fun. It contains mostly 3 tracks: first is the song Thieves’ Oil by Disemballerina, which I edited to fit the mood & timeframe of the video. Also, there are 2 different public domain recordings from radical/feminist protests in Brazil. A friend of mine who is fluent in Portuguese translated the chants as “Our body is ours, it is our choice” and “Watch out macho! Latin America is going to be completely feminist!”

Podcast Episode 10: Astral Speeches

astral-speeches-4Never let it be said that one cannot glean political insight from astral projection. This podcast contains 4 astral encounters.

Music is “Seems Like” by Freakwitch; Matthew Shields lyrics & vocals; James Lindenschmidt music, guitars, & production; Yo Bassman acoustic bass guitar; Alfred Lund drums.

Audio recording produced by James Lindenschmidt. ©2016 Crafted Recordings. Some Rights Reserved (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0).

Podcast Episode 9: Peoples’ Magic, Peoples’ Remembrancer

"The Storming of the Bastille", by Jean-Pierre Houël. Public Domain.

“The Storming of the Bastille”, by Jean-Pierre Houël. Public Domain.

This episode was a treat. I was lucky enough to interview A Peoples’ Remembrancer, Peter Linebaugh, on Bastille Day. These comments are taken from that conversation. We spoke about a lot of things, including Bastille Day; the Green and Red struggles of May Day; prisons, plantations, & the factory as locations of struggle; coal miners; the lungs as part of the nature; rewilding the cities; welfare as referring to wellness; how the magical Will is a social creation and becomes more powerful when shared collectively; and revolt as a Peoples’ Magic.

The excitement, the joy, the emotions, and the will is collective when it becomes powerful, and then it produces events that are totally unthought of. Who could have possibly imagined that a wall 90 feet high, in parts 30 feet thick, surrounded by a moat deep enough to drown in, who would have thought that such an edifice which had remained for centuries could be brought down in the space of less than 24 hours. That’s what we’re celebrating on the 14th of July, 1789. This edifice of tyranny, this edifice of repression, this action of people who are rewilding it has provided inspiration for every urban revolution that has ever taken place, and it provides us inspiration now that the carceral archipelago, the huge military prison complex of the USA, can be brought down in a twinkling. These are the miracles of history, but it’s just as accurate to say these are peoples’ magic.”
–Peter Linebaugh

Several months ago, I had an opportunity to record Moore, Wild, & Lynch in a living room in Maine. The music in this episode, an instrumental called “The Jig,” is from that session, along with several ambient recordings of city people celebrating and the ocean.

Audio recording ©2016 Crafted Recordings. Some Rights Reserved (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0).

Podcast Episode 8: The Origin of Dr Bones

Dr. BonesThose of you who wanted to hear more from Dr. Bones, whose masterful sermons and rants have been a big part of our podcasts thus far, here you are. Not much more to add; go listen to the man himself tell his story.

Thanks to Immune System for use of their song, Templar (©2016 Todd C. Ruzicka, Used with permission) as the background music in this episode. And thanks to the various storms that have rolled through Southern Maine recently for contributing their voices.

As always, if you have a story to tell that would be a good fit for the podcast, let us know.